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Campaign to Stop Killer Coke Press Release June 24, 2008

THE SUNY-WIDE CAMPAIGN TO HOLD COCA-COLA ACCOUNTABLE:
SUNY STONY BROOK PASSES THE TEST ON HUMAN RIGHTS; SUNY ALBANY FAILS!

PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release:
Tuesday, June 24, 2008

For more information:
Jackie Hayes, 518.391.3837 or sweatfreeua@gmail.com

As SUNY Stony Brook announced last week that it would NOT sign another contract with the Coca-Cola Company, students, faculty, and community members question UAlbany's recent decision to re-contract with Coca-Cola.

"UAlbany had the same information as Stony Brook in front of them about Coca-Cola's abuses, along with a petition signed by over 1,200 students. For them to ignore the petition, the United University Professions (UUP) resolution, the GSO resolution and all the documentation of Coke's abuses raises serious questions about the democratic nature of UAlbany's decision" stated Jackie Hayes, member of Students for Workers' Rights.

The Social Justice Alliance (SJA) at SUNY Stony Brook led the Stop Killer Coke campaign on campus, bringing Coca-Cola's international abuses to light and informing Stony Brook's decision to kick Coke off campus.

In a statement released by the Social Justice Alliance, Anita Halasz noted, "the Social Justice Alliance (SJA) started the Coca-Cola Campaign on Stony Brook Campus in Fall of 2005, where they began educating students on the corporation's human rights abuses with SINALTRAINAL, a union in Colombia."

SJA actively sought campus wide support, sent emails, organized call-ins, and hosted discussions with important speakers on campus. The Beverage Evaluation Committee at SUNY Stony Brook took student and faculty concerns seriously, ultimately deciding not to re-contract with Coca-Cola.

Kurt Amelang, a member of Students for Workers' Rights stated, "SUNY Stony Brook's initiative on the Coca-Cola issue demonstrates their commitment to human rights. SUNY Albany, on the other hand, has failed workers in Colombia, farmers in India, and the students, faculty and community members who want human rights to be a deciding factor in doing good business."